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November 2019

Poor circulation may affect one’s quality of life and can lead to possible health complications if not properly addressed. Some symptoms one may experience if they are dealing with poor circulation of the feet are a possible numbing and tingling feeling in the affected area, swelling of the feet, ankles, or legs, joint and muscle cramping, discoloration of the skin, and ulcers in the legs and feet. Poor circulation may also lead to a feeling of regular fatigue, digestive issues, and possible memory loss or trouble concentrating. If untreated, poor circulation of the feet may lead to serious complications, which is why we recommend it is best that you see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and advised recovery regime.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Cory Brown, DPM of Brown Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Abilene, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Thursday, 21 November 2019 00:00

Before you start dancing...

 

Monday, 18 November 2019 00:00

How Do Bunions Develop?

A bunion typically develops gradually, and is considered to be a deformity. It is defined as a bony protrusion that forms on the side of the big toe. This condition can occur as a result of genetic factors, or from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Symptoms that many patients may experience are redness and swelling surrounding the affected area, a burning sensation, or the feeling of numbness. In severe cases, an X-ray may be necessary to perform to help determine how large the bunion is, in addition to observing any existing arthritis. Moderate relief may be found if orthotics are worn, as well as resting the foot. If the bunion is causing extreme pain, surgery may be a viable option for treatment. This can be successful in permanently straightening and realigning the joints and bones. If you have developed a bunion, it is advised that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can offer treatment options that are correct for you.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Cory Brown, DPM of Brown Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Abilene, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Tuesday, 12 November 2019 00:00

Why Choose Foot Surgery?

Many patients choose to have foot surgery performed as an option to relieve severe pain and discomfort. Relief may be found when toenail removal is chosen to correct chronically infected ingrown toenails. Bunion surgery may be a choice to consider if the bunion is painful and unsightly. Research has indicated it is helpful to wear orthotics following a bunionectomy, as this may help to achieve long lasting relief. If pain is felt from a deformed ankle, the surgery that may help diminish the discomfort is referred to as an ankle fusion. Additionally, this type of surgery may help patients who have ankle arthritis, and neuromuscular disorders. If you have foot pain, and are considering surgery, it is strongly advised that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly guide you toward making the choice that is correct for you.

Foot surgery is sometimes necessary to treat a foot ailment. To learn more, contact Cory Brown, DPM of Brown Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

When Is Surgery Necessary?

Foot and ankle surgery is generally reserved for cases in which less invasive, conservative procedures have failed to alleviate the problem. Some of the cases in which surgery may be necessary include:

  • Removing foot deformities like bunions and bone spurs
  • Severe arthritis that has caused bone issues
  • Cosmetic reconstruction

What Types of Surgery Are There?

The type of surgery you receive will depend on the nature of the problem you have. Some of the possible surgeries include:

  • Bunionectomy for painful bunions
  • Surgical fusion for realignment of bones
  • Neuropathy decompression surgery to treat nerve damage

Benefits of Surgery

Although surgery is usually a last resort, it can provide more complete pain relief compared to non-surgical methods and may allow you to finally resume full activity.

Surgical techniques have also become increasingly sophisticated. Techniques like endoscopic surgery allow for smaller incisions and faster recovery times.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Abilene, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Surgery
Monday, 04 November 2019 00:00

Possible Causes of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

The pain that comes from tarsal tunnel syndrome, or TTS, is generally felt in the ankle, foot, and toes. It is considered to be a nerve disorder, and occurs when the surrounding nerves become inflamed. This can happen for a variety of reasons including: repetitive stress in sporting activities, excess body weight, or medical conditions such as tendonitis. Additionally, enduring an injury may play a significant role in developing this condition. These can consist of ankle sprains or dislocations. Some patients find relief in undergoing physical therapy, taking pain medications, resting the foot, or wearing orthotics. If you feel you have tarsal tunnel syndrome, please consult with a podiatrist who can advise you on correct treatment techniques.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Cory Brown, DPM of Brown Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Abilene, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
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